Amber, Gold & Black: The History of Britain's Great Beers by Martyn Cornell

By Martyn Cornell

Amber, Gold & Black

is a accomplished background of British beer in all its variety. It covers all there's to understand concerning the historical past of the beers Britons have brewed and loved down the centuries—Bitter, Porter, light and Stout, IPA, Brown Ale, Burton Ale and previous Ale, Barley Wine and Stingo, Golden Ale, Gale Ale, Honey Ale, White Beer, Heather Ale, and Mum. this can be a party of the depths of British beery historical past, a glance on the roots of the styles that are loved at the present time in addition to misplaced ales and beers, and a learn of ways the drinks that fill our beer glasses built through the years. From newbie to beer buff, this background will inform you belongings you by no means knew earlier than approximately Britain's favourite drink.

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By 1855 Punch magazine was making jokes about the ‘fast young gents’ who drank ‘bitter beer’ living an ‘embittered existence’. A few years later, in 1864, the music hall artist Tom Maclagan, dressed as a fashionable ‘swell’ in a top hat and monocle and with nine-inch-long ‘Dundreary’ sideburns, was performing a song in praise of ‘Bass’s Bitter Beer’, with the sheet music advertising India Pale Ale on the back page. The growing popularity of pale bitter ales among ‘fast young gents’ and swells (probably because pale ales were expensive and visibly different in the newly untaxed beer glasses that were then replacing pewter and china mugs in saloon bars) was intimately connected with the growth of Burton upon Trent as a brewing centre.

By 1855 Punch magazine was making jokes about the ‘fast young gents’ who drank ‘bitter beer’ living an ‘embittered existence’. A few years later, in 1864, the music hall artist Tom Maclagan, dressed as a fashionable ‘swell’ in a top hat and monocle and with nine-inch-long ‘Dundreary’ sideburns, was performing a song in praise of ‘Bass’s Bitter Beer’, with the sheet music advertising India Pale Ale on the back page. The growing popularity of pale bitter ales among ‘fast young gents’ and swells (probably because pale ales were expensive and visibly different in the newly untaxed beer glasses that were then replacing pewter and china mugs in saloon bars) was intimately connected with the growth of Burton upon Trent as a brewing centre.

While less hopped, they were strong, in order to try to keep bacterial infection away that would make them go sour and ropey. John Tuck’s Private Brewer’s Guide to the Art of Brewing Ale and Porter of 1822 says London ale in 1759 was brewed at 1½ to 1¾ barrels to the quarter of malt, around 1080 OG, while porter, which fell into the ‘beer’ category, was brewed at 2¼ to 2¾ barrels to the quarter, around 1065 OG. Even in 1819, Tuck’s figures suggest that London ale was still 1070 OG, perhaps 7 per cent abv, while porter was weaker at 1060.

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